lasylphidedubolchoi:

Mikhailovsky’s Giselle

Photo by Nikolai Krusser

"Brazilians were supporting Germany’s NT. Why? 6 months ago the germans arrived in Santa Cruz Cabrália (Bahia, Brazil) and bought a lot and built a hotel, a health center, a football field, donated an ambulance to the town, created a full-time school program in Cabralia, made a road that led to their training center, didn’t bring german employees hiring about 250 Cabrália citizens in their training center. Then the Germany NT arrived and: When not training, they socialized with the citizens in the town or in the beach, partied with the citizens, were kind to the fans always talking to them/taking pictures with them. About the win against our team: they were respectful with us, said that their idols were brazilian legends and that we shouldn’t lose our pride. They are thankful for the way they were welcome here. And they’ll donate the things they built to the population. It’s impossible not to support these guys."
— I translated this because people think it’s just because they beat Argentina. It’s not. (via winryrockbells)

(Source: argentie)

"

My mother once told me that trauma is like Lord of the Rings. You go through this crazy, life-altering thing that almost kills you (like say having to drop the one ring into Mount Doom), and that thing by definition cannot possibly be understood by someone who hasn’t gone through it. They can sympathize sure, but they’ll never really know, and more than likely they’ll expect you to move on from the thing fairly quickly. And they can’t be blamed, people are just like that, but that’s not how it works.

Some lucky people are like Sam. They can go straight home, get married, have a whole bunch of curly headed Hobbit babies and pick up their gardening right where they left off, content to forget the whole thing and live out their days in peace. Lots of people however, are like Frodo, and they don’t come home the same person they were when they left, and everything is more horrible and more hard then it ever was before. The old wounds sting and the ghost of the weight of the one ring still weighs heavy on their minds, and they don’t fit in at home anymore, so they get on boats go sailing away to the Undying West to look for the sort of peace that can only come from within. Frodos can’t cope, and most of us are Frodos when we start out.

But if we move past the urge to hide or lash out, my mother always told me, we can become Pippin and Merry. They never ignored what had happened to them, but they were malleable and receptive to change. They became civic leaders and great storytellers; they we able to turn all that fear and anger and grief into narratives that others could delight in and learn from, and they used the skills they had learned in battle to protect their homeland. They were fortified by what had happened to them, they wore it like armor and used it to their advantage.

It is our trauma that turns us into guardians, my mother told me, it is suffering that strengthens our skin and softens our hearts, and if we learn to live with the ghosts of what had been done to us, we just may be able to save others from the same fate.

"
— S.T.Gibson (via sarahtaylorgibson)
"A woman from the audience asks: ‘Why were there so few women among the Beat writers?’ and [Gregory] Corso, suddenly utterly serious, leans forward and says: “There were women, they were there, I knew them, their families put them in institutions, they were given electric shock. In the ’50s if you were male you could be a rebel, but if you were female your families had you locked up."

Stephen Scobie, on the Naropa Institute’s 1994 tribute to Allen Ginsberg  (via thisisendless)

FUCK

(via femmeboyant)

I’m just frozen. Absences of women in history don’t “just happen,” they are made.

(via queereyes-queerminds)

(Source: fuckyeahbeatniks)

nosdrinker:

reblog if you agree

evashandor:

brownfatfemme:

merpldom:

merpldom:

So I’ve seen this post going around in link form, which isn’t super useful to anyone who wants to read it, so I put it up in photo form. Useful for anyone who doesn’t have xkit. :3 Definitely like and reblog the OP, but if it shows up as a link, this helps. :3

I fixed the link for the OP so it works now :)

NEED THIS IN MY LIFE RN!!! THANK YOU TUMBLR!

I suck at cover letters so this is fab
evashandor:

brownfatfemme:

merpldom:

merpldom:

So I’ve seen this post going around in link form, which isn’t super useful to anyone who wants to read it, so I put it up in photo form. Useful for anyone who doesn’t have xkit. :3 Definitely like and reblog the OP, but if it shows up as a link, this helps. :3

I fixed the link for the OP so it works now :)

NEED THIS IN MY LIFE RN!!! THANK YOU TUMBLR!

I suck at cover letters so this is fab
evashandor:

brownfatfemme:

merpldom:

merpldom:

So I’ve seen this post going around in link form, which isn’t super useful to anyone who wants to read it, so I put it up in photo form. Useful for anyone who doesn’t have xkit. :3 Definitely like and reblog the OP, but if it shows up as a link, this helps. :3

I fixed the link for the OP so it works now :)

NEED THIS IN MY LIFE RN!!! THANK YOU TUMBLR!

I suck at cover letters so this is fab

evashandor:

brownfatfemme:

merpldom:

merpldom:

So I’ve seen this post going around in link form, which isn’t super useful to anyone who wants to read it, so I put it up in photo form. Useful for anyone who doesn’t have xkit. :3 Definitely like and reblog the OP, but if it shows up as a link, this helps. :3

I fixed the link for the OP so it works now :)

NEED THIS IN MY LIFE RN!!! THANK YOU TUMBLR!

I suck at cover letters so this is fab

(Source: merplmom)

nannaia:

A while ago I was asked about the construction of the Vietnamese Ao Dai and Chinese Cheongsam/Qipao. I had a few dresses at my disposal and figured it would be fun to do a compare and contrast. Due to the small collection, I was only able to photograph a few samples (all tailored circa 2000s, except one I’m sure…). This basically just covers the “classic” tailoring styles of Ao Dai and Cheongsam/Qipao. The latest trends may not adhere to it!
NOTE: For simplicity’s sake, I primarily used the word Cheongsam (Cantonese) instead of Qípáo (Mandarin) because its wider use as an English loanword.
nannaia:

A while ago I was asked about the construction of the Vietnamese Ao Dai and Chinese Cheongsam/Qipao. I had a few dresses at my disposal and figured it would be fun to do a compare and contrast. Due to the small collection, I was only able to photograph a few samples (all tailored circa 2000s, except one I’m sure…). This basically just covers the “classic” tailoring styles of Ao Dai and Cheongsam/Qipao. The latest trends may not adhere to it!
NOTE: For simplicity’s sake, I primarily used the word Cheongsam (Cantonese) instead of Qípáo (Mandarin) because its wider use as an English loanword.
nannaia:

A while ago I was asked about the construction of the Vietnamese Ao Dai and Chinese Cheongsam/Qipao. I had a few dresses at my disposal and figured it would be fun to do a compare and contrast. Due to the small collection, I was only able to photograph a few samples (all tailored circa 2000s, except one I’m sure…). This basically just covers the “classic” tailoring styles of Ao Dai and Cheongsam/Qipao. The latest trends may not adhere to it!
NOTE: For simplicity’s sake, I primarily used the word Cheongsam (Cantonese) instead of Qípáo (Mandarin) because its wider use as an English loanword.
nannaia:

A while ago I was asked about the construction of the Vietnamese Ao Dai and Chinese Cheongsam/Qipao. I had a few dresses at my disposal and figured it would be fun to do a compare and contrast. Due to the small collection, I was only able to photograph a few samples (all tailored circa 2000s, except one I’m sure…). This basically just covers the “classic” tailoring styles of Ao Dai and Cheongsam/Qipao. The latest trends may not adhere to it!
NOTE: For simplicity’s sake, I primarily used the word Cheongsam (Cantonese) instead of Qípáo (Mandarin) because its wider use as an English loanword.
nannaia:

A while ago I was asked about the construction of the Vietnamese Ao Dai and Chinese Cheongsam/Qipao. I had a few dresses at my disposal and figured it would be fun to do a compare and contrast. Due to the small collection, I was only able to photograph a few samples (all tailored circa 2000s, except one I’m sure…). This basically just covers the “classic” tailoring styles of Ao Dai and Cheongsam/Qipao. The latest trends may not adhere to it!
NOTE: For simplicity’s sake, I primarily used the word Cheongsam (Cantonese) instead of Qípáo (Mandarin) because its wider use as an English loanword.
nannaia:

A while ago I was asked about the construction of the Vietnamese Ao Dai and Chinese Cheongsam/Qipao. I had a few dresses at my disposal and figured it would be fun to do a compare and contrast. Due to the small collection, I was only able to photograph a few samples (all tailored circa 2000s, except one I’m sure…). This basically just covers the “classic” tailoring styles of Ao Dai and Cheongsam/Qipao. The latest trends may not adhere to it!
NOTE: For simplicity’s sake, I primarily used the word Cheongsam (Cantonese) instead of Qípáo (Mandarin) because its wider use as an English loanword.
nannaia:

A while ago I was asked about the construction of the Vietnamese Ao Dai and Chinese Cheongsam/Qipao. I had a few dresses at my disposal and figured it would be fun to do a compare and contrast. Due to the small collection, I was only able to photograph a few samples (all tailored circa 2000s, except one I’m sure…). This basically just covers the “classic” tailoring styles of Ao Dai and Cheongsam/Qipao. The latest trends may not adhere to it!
NOTE: For simplicity’s sake, I primarily used the word Cheongsam (Cantonese) instead of Qípáo (Mandarin) because its wider use as an English loanword.

nannaia:

A while ago I was asked about the construction of the Vietnamese Ao Dai and Chinese Cheongsam/Qipao. I had a few dresses at my disposal and figured it would be fun to do a compare and contrast. Due to the small collection, I was only able to photograph a few samples (all tailored circa 2000s, except one I’m sure…). This basically just covers the “classic” tailoring styles of Ao Dai and Cheongsam/Qipao. The latest trends may not adhere to it!

NOTE: For simplicity’s sake, I primarily used the word Cheongsam (Cantonese) instead of Qípáo (Mandarin) because its wider use as an English loanword.

heatherbat:

stunningpicture:

‘Cause people seem to only post the 20-something Audrey Hepburn.

Audrey Hepburn was the granddaughter of a baron, the daughter of a nazi sympathizer, spent her teens doing ballet to secretly raise money for the dutch resistance against the nazis, and spent her post-film career as a goodwill ambassador of UNICEF, winning the presidential medal of freedom for her efforts.
…and history remembers her as pretty.

heatherbat:

stunningpicture:

‘Cause people seem to only post the 20-something Audrey Hepburn.

Audrey Hepburn was the granddaughter of a baron, the daughter of a nazi sympathizer, spent her teens doing ballet to secretly raise money for the dutch resistance against the nazis, and spent her post-film career as a goodwill ambassador of UNICEF, winning the presidential medal of freedom for her efforts.

…and history remembers her as pretty.

breakingnews:

AP: A White House official said Monday that President Obama will sign an order banning discrimination against federal contractors on the basis of their sexual orientation.